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260 years of
Quality Fashion

The FALKE for Liberty exclusive collaboration merges 260 years of quality fashion experience. The collection combines FALKE knowledge in knitting legwear with iconic LIBERTY prints, each piece handmade and unique. We are proud of this extraordinary legwear for a modern dandy.

 

More about Liberty


Strawberry Thief

This is one of the great Arts and Crafts textile designs of the past that was designed by William Morris in 1883. Liberty first produced it as a furnishing fabric in 1979 and it has since been redrawn for Tana lawn on a smaller scale. It is a floral conversational with birds and vegetation arranged in a trail layout. Strawberry Thief has been a Liberty Classic since 1995

 

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Lodden

Lodden, another iconic Arts & Crafts textile design of the past was revived for the Classic Collection in autumn winter 2007. It was originally designed by William Morris in 1884, but was made into Libertys own design by rescaling and recolouring it. Leaves, branches and flowers interweave to form the typical stylised repeat.

 

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Bourton

The paisley style pattern was a popular theme for 19th century shawls ever since the original shawls were imported from Kashmir in the early 19th century. Liberty owns a wonderful collection of drawings for printed paisley shawls from the mid-19th century, which have provided the studio with inspiration for many years. Bourton was produced on dress fabrics in the 1960s. It is a medium sized paisley floral trail with dense scattered pine shapes and has been part of our Classic Tana range since 1987.

 

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Felix and Isabelle

Felix and Isabelle was derived from a design in the dress fabric ranges which in turn was based on a paisley shawl drawing of the 1850s from the Liberty archive. It is a detailed ferny paisley arranged in a trail layout. The pattern was added to the Liberty classics range in spring 2013.

 

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Paisley Tears

A transfixing medley of spinning and drifting paisleys in a rich palette inspired by its Oriental origins, Paisley Tears was created for the seasonal SS16 Liberty collection.

 

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Gambier

Gambier was created for the seasonal AW15 Liberty collection, and inspired from the intricate patterns on the garments of the aristocrasy and clergy of Hans Holbeins paintings. The central motif of the print references the highly popular pomegranate design of the Tudor period.

 

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cotton cotton
High quality Fil d'Ecosse cotton
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Perfect Falke Fit
antislip Silk
Anti-slip cotton sole inside
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High quality

High quality Fil d'Ecosse cotton

Fil d'Ecosse is pure karnak cotton from the Egyptian Nile delta. Once it has blossomed under the Mediterranean sun, the fibres and seeds are painstakingly combed from the cotton wool to create a product of the utmost purity and softness. Italian spinning mills use the extra long fibres to produce a yarn of particular strength and durability. The additional mercerising finishing process gives the Fil d'Ecosse its silky shine and unique colour intensity.

liberty

The History of Liberty

Arthur Lasenby Liberty was born in Chesham, Buckinghamshire in 1843. He was employed by Messrs Farmer and Rogers in Regent Street in 1862, the year of the International Exhibition at Kensington in London. By 1874, inspired by his 10 years of service, Arthur decided to start a business of his own, which he did the next year.

With a £2,000 loan from his future father-in-law, Arthur Liberty accepted the lease of half a shop at 218a Regent Street with only three staff members.

The shop opened during 1875 selling ornaments, fabric and objets dart from Japan and the East. Within eighteen months Arthur Liberty had repaid the loan and acquired the second half of 218 Regent Street. As the business grew, neighbouring properties were bought and added.

In 1885, 142–144 Regent Street was acquired and housed the ever-increasing demand for carpets and furniture. The basement was named the Eastern Bazaar, and was the vending place for what was described as "decorative furnishing objects". He named the property Chesham House after the place in which he grew up. The store became the most fashionable place to shop in London and Liberty fabrics were used for both clothing and furnishings. Some of its clientele was exotic, and included famous Pre-Raphaelite artists.

In 1884 Liberty introduced the costume department into the Regent Street store, directed by Edward William Godwin (1833–86). Godwin was a distinguished architect. He was a founding member of the Costume Society in 1882. He and Arthur Liberty created in-house apparel to challenge the fashions of Paris.

In November 1885, Liberty brought forty-two villagers from India to stage a living village of Indian artisans. Liberty s specialized in Oriental goods, in particular imported Indian silks, and the aim of the display was to generate both publicity and sales for the store. However, it was a disaster commercially and publicly, with concern about the way the villagers were put on display.

During the 1890s Arthur Lasenby Liberty built strong relationships with many English designers. Many of these designers, including Archibald Knox, practised the artistic styles known as Arts and Crafts and Art Nouveau, and Liberty helped develop Art Nouveau through his encouragement of such designers. The company became associated with this new style, to the extent that in Italy, Art Nouveau became known as the Stile Liberty, after the London shop.

The store became one of the most prestigious in London.


Products

FALKE

Liberty Men Socks

44.00 €

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FALKE

Liberty Men Socks

44.00 €

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FALKE

Liberty Men Socks

44.00 €

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